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Ron Wyden, Ore. Libraries Call for Support of Net Neutrality

Monday, November 10, 2014

 

U.S. Senator Ron Wyden and Candice Watkins, president of the Oregon Library Association, issues a statement Monday urging public support for net neutrality.

Net neutrality is the principal that the Federal Communications Commissions operates under, in which, all internet service, regardless of its speed is priced the same.  Under a proposal put forward by the FCC and supported by large telecommunications companies, a new multi-tier pricing system could go into place, that charges more for faster internet speed.

“The governing principle of the Internet to date has been net neutrality — bits are bits, and Internet service providers should not prioritize content delivery based on ability to pay,” the two stated in an editorial in the East Oregonian newspaper.

The two support the flat fee system currently in place.  Wyden’s office said that proposed changes to internet neutrality would create a “pay-to-play Internet fast lane.” Librarians, public schools and lawmakers are worried that the plan would limit their access to internet services and that ebooks, digital music and research databases would be delivered at slower speeds, according to Wyden’s staff.

“We share the view that the Internet must remain neutral if it is to continue to support freedom of speech, open new educational frontiers and spur economic growth,“ the editorial in the East Oregonian stated.

CenturyLink, the third largest telecommunications company in the nation, provides internet service to Portland. The company has stated on its website that it supports reform to the FCC regulations.

A CenturyLink spokeswoman did not immediately respond to an inquire left by GoLocalPDX.

 

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