Welcome! Login | Register
 

Two Weeks to the Election Day Finish Line—Sunday Political Brunch October 21, 2018—Two Weeks to the Election Day Finish Line…

Crypto’s Summer Time Sadness, Paul Johnson, Guest MINDSETTER™—Crypto's Summer Time Sadness, Paul Johnson, Guest MINDSETTER™

A Look Back, & A Look Ahead, At Oregon’s Back-to-Back Weekends vs. Washington Teams—A Look Back, & A Look Ahead, At…

Microsoft Co-Founder Allen Passes Away at 65—Microsoft Co-Founder Allen Passes Away at 65

Of Political Odds and Ends—The Sunday Political Brunch October 14, 2018—Of Political Odds and Ends -- The Sunday…

Kaplan: Personalized Medicine by Design—Kaplan: Personalized Medicine by Design

Portland Ranked as Best Foodie City in Country—Portland Ranked as Best Foodie City in Country

UN Ambassador Nikki Haley Resigns—UN Ambassador Nikki Haley Resigns

“Is the Trump Political Bubble About to Burst?”—Sunday Political Brunch—October 7, 2018—“Is the Trump Political Bubble About to Burst?”…

Goodbye Earl Thomas And Thank You For The Memories—Goodbye Earl Thomas And Thank You For The…

 
 

Equal Pay Bill Passes Oregon Legislature, Now Pending Before Governor Brown

Thursday, May 28, 2015

 

Today, the Oregon Senate passed a bill intended to help close the wage gap for women and people of color in Oregon. The Senate passed the bill 17 to 13 in a nearly party line vote, and it is now pending before Governor Kate Brown. 

The bill, sponsored by Senator Diane Rosenbaum and Representatives Carla Piluso, Barbara Smith Warner and Jessica Vega Pederson, protects employees who inquire about, discuss, or disclose information about their wage or the wage of a coworker from disciplinary action. The measure also protects any employee who makes a charge or files a complaint based on the disclosure of wage information by the employee. This will make it possible for working Oregonians to access more information about how their pay compares to that of a colleague, while removing the potential for fear of retaliation, according to Family Forward Oregon.

“Equal pay for equal work is still a far off reality, which has dire consequences for women and the families who rely on them. We know that closing the wage gap in Oregon will take more than one policy change, but we are very pleased to see our lawmakers stepping up to take this important first step today,” said Family Forward’s Executive Director Andrea Paluso. “Without the ability to share pay information, women can’t even know when they’re being unfairly paid and by how much, let alone fix it. This is a sign that women’s economic security is a becoming a priority for our lawmakers.”

Work to close the wage gap in Oregon began with Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian, who in 2011 directed the Oregon Council on Civil Rights to create a formal set of policy recommendations to close the wage gap in Oregon. Two years later during the 2013 legislative session, the Legislative Assembly passed Senate Bill 744 to direct the Council to study wage inequality and the factors that contribute to it. In January 2014, the Council issued its formal recommendations to address pay inequality in Oregon.

"Oregon’s pay gap doesn’t just hurt women and people of color, it hurts everyone, said Brad Avakian, Oregon Labor Commissioner. “By creating greater pay transparency, we can protect employees from retaliation and take an important step in the fight for equal pay. That’s good for individual workers, but also communities around the state.”

“Closing the wage gap is a priority for me. Pay inequity is clearly unfair and has significant impacts on women’s short and long-term economic security. When women earn less than men, their families also suffer the consequences, as do our communities when families are poorer and Oregonians have fewer dollars in their pockets,” said Representative Jessica Vega Pederson, a chief sponsor of the bill. “Making it easier for people to know if they’re being paid unequally, as HB 2007 does, is an important first step towards paying men, women, and people of color equally for equal work all across Oregon.”

 

Related Slideshow: Oregon’s 20 Best Jobs That Don’t Require a College Degree

There are many high-paying jobs in Oregon that don't require a four year college degree. The Oregon Employment Department looked at the average wages and future openings of these jobs. Check out what people can make without a degree. 

Prev Next

#20

Executive Secretaries & Admin. Assistants

Training required: None

Total openings by 2022: 1,823

Average hourly wage: $22.97

Prev Next

#19

Supervisors & Managers of Office and Administrative Support Workers

Training required: None

Total openings by 2022: 5,744

Average hourly wage: $23.18

Prev Next

#18

Licensed Practical & Vocational Nurses

Training required: Postsecondary non-degree

Total openings by 2022: 1,197

Average hourly wage: $23.39

Prev Next

#17

Sheet Metal Workers

Training required: Apprenticeship

Total openings by 2022: 1,046

Average hourly wage: $23.99

Photo Credit: ellencanderson via Compfight cc

Prev Next

#16

Operating Engineers & Other Construction Equipment Operators

Training required: Moderate term on-the-job

Total openings by 2022: 1,323

Average hourly wage: $24.31

Photo credit: Nomadic Lass on Flickr

Prev Next

#15

Industrial Machinery Mechanics

Training required: Long term on-the-job

Total openings by 2022: 2,298

Average hourly wage: $25.58

Photo credit: Kyle May on Flickr

Prev Next

#14

Supervisors & Managers of Production and Operating Workers

Training required:  None

Total openings by 2022: 1,776

Average hourly wage: $25.68

Photo Credit: ste3ve via Compfight cc

Prev Next

#13

Supervisors & Managers of Transportation/Material-Moving Vehicle Operators

Training required: None

Total openings by 2022: 1,138

Average hourly wage: $25.82

Photo Credit: Andrew Kudrin via Compfight cc

Prev Next

#12

Wholesale & Manufacture Representatives

Training required: Moderate term on-the-job

Total openings by 2022: 5,515

Average hourly wage: $25.86

Photo Credit: toolstop via Compfight cc

Prev Next

#11

Correction Officers & Jailers

Training required: Moderate term on-the-job

Total openings by 2022: 1,346

Average hourly wage: $26.27

Prev Next

#10

Insurance Sales Agents

Training required: Postsecondary non-degree

Total openings by 2022: 1,084

Average hourly wage: $26.71

Prev Next

#9

Supervisors & Managers of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers

Training required: None

Total openings by 2022: 1,614

Average hourly wage: $27.78

Photo credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Europe District on Flickr

Prev Next

#8

Property, Real Estate, & Community Association Managers

Training required: None

Total openings by 2022: 1,053

Average hourly wage: $26.80

Prev Next

#7

Postal Service Mail Carriers

Training required: Short term on-the-job

Total openings by 2022: 1,136

Average hourly wage: $26.88

Photo Credit: Charles Henry via Compfight cc

Prev Next

#6

Supervisors & Managers of Non-retail Sales Workers

Training required: None

Total openings by 2022: 987

Average hourly wage: $28.62

Prev Next

#5

Firefighters

Training required:  Postecondary non-degree

Total openings by 2022: 1,374

Average hourly wage: $30.41

Prev Next

#4

Police & Sheriff Patrol Officers

Training required: Moderate on-the-job

Total openings by 2022: 1,824

Average hourly wage: $31.38

Prev Next

#3

Plumbers, Pipers & Steamfitters

Training required: Apprenticeship

Total openings by 2022: 1,066

Average hourly wage: $32.59

Photo Credit: kozumel via Compfight cc

Prev Next

#2

Carpenters

Training required: Apprenticeship

Total openings by 2022: 2,659

Average hourly wage: $33.21

Photo Credit: freezr via Compfight cc

Prev Next

#1

Computer Occupations

Training required: Postsecondary non-degree

Total openings by 2022: 1,694

Average hourly wage: $36.19

Photo Credit: Dave Dugdale via Compfight cc

 
 

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

 

X

Stay Connected — Free
Daily Email