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Portland Then/Now: Southwest 2nd Ave. and Yamhill Street

Thursday, November 06, 2014

 

SW Yamhill St. and 2nd Ave., 1939. City of Portland Archives

SW Yamhill St. and 2nd Ave., 2014. Photo by Byron Beck

Portland Then/Now: Southwest 2nd Avenue and Yamhill Street

THEN: Here lies the intersection of Southwest Second Avenue and Yamhill Street in downtown Portland.

In 1939 Second Avenue was a bustling street full of businesses that catered to the downtown worker including Red Front Mens Clothing, Rosini's, John's Steak House (which stated it was "open all night") Fred Bell Jewelry , Wilson Auction House and Gervurtz Furniture.

These businesses were nestled amongst lunch counters, billiard halls and a restaurant called Chop Suey.  

NOW: Some of the buildings that lined this now one-way street are still here, but have found new lives as breweries and educational outlets.

The Centennial Block, which was home to Gevurtz Furniture now houses Rock Bottom Brewery. The Steel Bridge though still sits off on the horizon. 

 

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