Welcome! Login | Register
 

The Post-Election Hangover—The Sunday Political Brunch November 18, 2018—The Post-Election Hangover -- The Sunday Political Brunch…

REPORT: Allen Was Willing To Deal Lillard To Team Of ‘His Liking’ If He Demanded Trade—REPORT: Allen Was Willing To Deal Lillard To…

From Boggs To LeBron, What Does Science Say About ‘Mind Over Matter’ Superstition In Sports—From Boggs To LeBron, What Does Science Say…

Seahawks vs. Packers – Key Matchups, Prediction For Thursday Night Football—Seahawks vs. Packers – Key Matchups, Prediction For…

Portland Ranked 4th Best City for Singles—Portland Ranked 4th Best City for Singles

Comic Book Legend Stan Lee Passes Away at 95—Comic Book Legend Stan Lee Passes Away at…

Fit for Life: Magnify the Positive in Your Life Today—Fit for Life: Magnify the Positive in Your…

The Political “Purple Wave” of 2018—Sunday Political Brunch November 11, 2018—The Political “Purple Wave” of 2018 -- Sunday…

3 Seahawks Players That Deserve More Love At Midseason—3 Seahawks Players That Deserve More Love At…

These Are The 8 Benefits Of Tea (& Top 8 Teas) You Need To Know About—These Are The 8 Benefits Of Tea (&…

 
 

College Admissions: Can You Play Your Sport in College?

Wednesday, June 03, 2015

 

Sometimes my job involves being a “dream crusher”. It’s not a part of the job I like. 

I often have parents come into my office with the expectation that their son or daughter will be able to play his or her sport in college.  For some, this is a realistic option.  For others, not so much. 

To start off, here are some facts about collegiate sports and athletic scholarships:

1. A lot of athletes contend for limited opportunities.  There are 7,400,000 high school student athletes and 460,000 NCAA student athletes.  Statistically, about 6% of student athletes will end up being able to compete in college.

2. The odds of winning an NCAA sports scholarship are long. Only about 2% of high school athletes win sports scholarships every year at NCAA colleges and universities. For those who do snag one, the average scholarship is less than $11,000.

3. Full-ride sports scholarships are in short supply. There are only six sports where all the scholarships are full ride. These so-called head-count sports are football, men and women's basketball, and women's gymnastics, volleyball, and tennis. In these Division I sports, athletes receive a full ride or no ride.

4. Scholarship amounts can be modest. Beyond the head-count sports, all other sports are considered "equivalency" sports. NCAA rules dictate how much money a program, such as lacrosse or track, can spend on scholarships. Coaches can slice and dice these awards as they choose, which can lead to smaller scholarships than you might expect.

5. Take flattery with a grain of salt. Coaches may tell teenagers that they have lots of scholarship money to divvy out, but prospective student athletes shouldn't assume that they will be the recipients. A coach might not know whether he really wants a certain player until he finds out what other prospective players want to sign on to the team, and then he may drop the player with whom he had been in discussion.

6. A verbal commitment is meaningless. There is no guarantee that an athlete who verbally commits to a team will end up on it. A coach can change her mind about a prospect.

7. Playing high-level college sports will be a full-time job. Division I athletes may as well be called full-time employees of their schools because of the long hours they “work” to fulfill their sport commitment.  According to an NCAA survey last year, playing football required 43.3 hours per week; college baseball, 42.1 hours; men's basketball, 39.2 hours; and women's basketball, 37.6 hours. Because of the huge time commitment, as well as time away from campus, Division I athletes will often find it extremely difficult to major in rigorous disciplines, such as the sciences and engineering. If this is the case, having the ability to play a Division I sport does not always mean that one should.  Division III schools should be under consideration in certain scenarios.  

With all of this in mind, here are some ways to determine if your student/athlete can compete in college.  Keep in mind that you are working to determine if he can compete collegiately as well as which NCAA Division (NCAA Division I, II, or III or NAIA) is the best fit for his abilities.   

Timed/measured sports are easier to discern.  For swimming or track & field, one can look at a “time” (distance, etc.) and know whether the student will be able to compete collegiately by comparing their times against how fast the student/athletes are swimming, running, etc. in college.  Generally, coaches want to see that a student/athlete can “score” for them in their Athletic Conference to determine if they will make the roster and/or receive some sort of athletic scholarship funding.  Obviously, the faster they are, the more money they may receive.  We can look at CollegeSwimming.com, for example, and see if a swimmer’s current times could score in any particular conference as well as where her times would place her on a given college roster.  In this way, we can tell if the student has a realistic chance of competing for that college, or any college.

For “subjective” sports (soccer, softball, basketball, etc.) it’s a bit harder to determine whether an athlete could compete collegiately, as well as which NCAA Division she is best suited for.  This is done through a series of steps such as communicating to coaches, followed by sending video of her play, and participating in ID Camps and college showcases to get “exposure”.  As the student starts writing to coaches, she notes which college coaches are writing back with possible interest, which helps direct the search towards the best athletic fit (Division I, Division II or Division III or NAIA).  If no coaches write back, this is an answer as well.  For certain sports, it’s also telling if an athlete made their Varsity high school team freshman or sophomore year rather than in later years. 

While I don’t want to discourage student/athletes from pursuing their dream of playing collegiate athletics, it’s important to be realistic about their chances of competing at this extremely competitive next level. 

Kathy Smith Connor is the owner of Connor College Consulting. She swam for Stanford on a full athletic scholarship, competed on several US National swim teams and was an alternate to the 1980 United States Olympic Team. She helps student athletes find their best fit college academically, socially, financially and athletically. Contact her at [email protected].

Jodi Walder-Biesanz is the founder of Portland, Oregon-based College Admission Coach LLC which helps students identify and gain admission to right-fit schools where they will thrive academically and personally. Contact her at [email protected].

 

Related Slideshow: 30 Famous College Grads From Oregon

Who are some of the most famous people to graduate from Oregon schools? Here is a list of a few of the most interesting or surprising alumni you probably didn't know came from Oregon.

Prev Next

Mike Richardson

Portland State University, Class of 1977

Founder of Dark Horse Comics, the third largest comic-book publisher in the U.S., and founder of Dark Horse Entertainment, which has produced over two dozen films and television projects.

Prev Next

Signe Toly Anderson

Portland State University, 1960-1963

Lead female vocalist for the band Jefferson Airplane, jazz and folk singer, and member of the Oregon Music Hall of Fame.

Prev Next

Katie Harman

Portland State University, Class of 2002

Crowned Miss America the same year she graduated from PSU.

Prev Next

Carolyn Davidson

Portland State University, Class of 1971

Creator of the Nike Swoosh. 

Prev Next

Jordan Senn

Portland State University, Class of 2007

Two time Academic All-American for the PSU football team, who signed on as a free agent with the Indianapolis Colts, and also played for the Carolina Panthers and the Chicago Bears.

Prev Next

Barry Hansen

Reed College, Class of 1963

Nationally renowned radio show host Dr. Demento, with weekly show of "mad music and crazy comedy." 

Prev Next

Barbara Ehrenreich

Reed College, Class of 1963

Award winning essayist, political activist and author of New York Times Best Seller, "Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America." 

Prev Next

Earl Blumenauer

Lewis and Clark College, Class of 1970 and 1976

U.S. Representative for Oregon’s 3rd district since 1996 and a leading proponent of livable communities.

Prev Next

Matt Wuerker

Lewis and Clark College, Class of 1979

Winner of a Pulitzer Prize in 2012 for editorial cartooning, as well as a finalist for the award in 2009 and 2010, and one of the founding staff members of Politico.

Prev Next

Heidi Hitkamp

Lewis and Clark College, Class of 1980

Hitkamp was the first woman ever elected to represent North Dakota in either the U.S. Senate or House. She has been a Senator since 2013.

Prev Next

Matt Biondi

Lewis and Clark College, Class of 2000

Winner of 11 Olympic medals in swimming and one of the most decorated American Olympians of all time.

Prev Next

Greg Behrendt

University of Oregon, Class of 1991

After starting out to study business, Behrendt went on to become a script consultant for Sex and the City, as well as a standup comedian and author.

Photo Credit: Facebook: Greg Behrendt 

Prev Next

Walter Brattain

University of Oregon, Class of 1926

Inventor of the transistor, “the most important invention of the 20th Century,” and co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1956.

Prev Next

Neil Everett

University of Oregon, Class of 1984

ESPN Sports Center anchor

Prev Next

James Ivory

University of Oregon, Class of 1951

Director of several films, including Academy Award winners A Room with a View and Howard’s End, and founder of Merchant Ivory Productions.

Photo via IMDB.com

Prev Next

Renee James

University of Oregon, Class of 1986

President of Intel, after a promotion to the two-person executive team in 2013 and ranked 37th on Forbes World’s 100 Most Powerful Women.

Prev Next

Linus Pauling

Oregon State University, Class of 1922

The only person ever to win two unshared Nobel Prizes, Pauling was the leader of his time in chemistry. One of his Nobel Prizes was for peace, after his efforts to end atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons.  

Prev Next

Mercedes Bates

AKA Betty Crocker

Oregon State University, Class of 1936

Head of Betty Crocker Kitchens at General Mills, and the first female corporate officer for the company, Bates also developed the Betty Crocker character, turning it into a national icon.

Prev Next

Julie Bentz

Oregon State University, Class of 1986

The first female officer in the Oregon Army National Guard to reach the rank of general. Bentz is now a member of President Obama’s National Security Staff.  

Prev Next

George Bruns

Oregon State University, Class of 1936

Music Director for Walt Disney Productions for over 25 years, wrote the “Ballad of Davy Crockett,” and music for “Tony the Tiger” and “Pillsbury Doughboy” ad campaigns. Burns directed the music for “Sleeping Beauty,” “Robin Hood,” and the Mickey Mouse Club TV show.

Prev Next

Vance DeBar 'Pinto' Colvig

Oregon State University, Class of 1911

Mostly known as the voice for Disney’s cartoon “Goofy” for over 20 years, Colvig also voiced "Sleepy" and "Grumpy" in "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." Colvig also wrote the song "Who's Afraid of the Big, Bad Wolf," performed all the sound effects for Jack Benny’s 1930s radio show, and was Capital Record’s first Bozo the Clown in the 1940s.

Prev Next

Timothy Leatherman

Oregon State University, Class of 1970

Inventor of the Leatherman multi-tool.

Prev Next

Dick Fosbury

Oregon State University, Class of 1972

Revolutionized the high-jumping sport by jumping over the bar backward--coined the “Fosbury Flop.” He won a gold medal in the event at the Mexico City Olympics in 1968.

Prev Next

Alan Hart

OHSU, Class of 1917

Born as Alberta Lucille Hart, Hart became one of the first female-to-male transexuals in the United States, after graduating from the School of Medicine. He also was a pioneer for using radiology to detect tuberculosis.  

Prev Next

R. Bradley Sack

OHSU, Class of 1960

Internationally recognized for his work with oral rehydration therapy (ORT) which became the worldwide standard for treatment of dehydration and diarrhea.

Prev Next

Oscar Frederick “Doc” Willing

OHSU

After receiving a degree in dentistry from OHSU, Willing went on to become one of the top American amateur golfers of the 20th Century, and is one of 15 indvudals undefeated in U.S. Foursomes and Singles Matches in the Walker cup.

Prev Next

Harry Glickman

University of Oregon, Class of 1948

Founder and president emeritus of the Portland Trail Blazers. 

Prev Next

Norma Paulus

Willamette University, Class of 1962

Former Oregon Secretary of State, Paulus was the first woman to hold a statewide elected office in Oregon.

Prev Next

Patrick Carman

Willamette University, Class of 1988

New York Times best-selling author for his children's fantasy series The Land of Elyon, Atherton, and Elliot's Park. 

Prev Next

Shelley Beattie

Southern Oregon University, 1988

Professional bodybuilder who won third place in Ms. International and Ms. Olympia, a member of the first all-female America’s Cup Team, and an actress on the TV show “American Gladiator.”  

 
 

Related Articles

 

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

 
Delivered Free Every
Day to Your Inbox